Districts team up to reduce reliance on imported water

The Water Replenishment District of Southern California and West Basin Municipal Water District have signed a historic agreement to supply 100% of a seawater barrier with recycled water, eliminating the need for imported water...

LOS ANGELES, CA, Apr. 18, 2009 -- The Water Replenishment District of Southern California (WRD) and West Basin Municipal Water District (West Basin) today signed a historic agreement to supply 100% of a seawater barrier with recycled water, eliminating the need for imported water. By using recycled water where imported drinking water has historically been used, the project will save 5.5 billion gallons of drinking water each year, enough to serve 136,000 people for one year.

"The project is a great example of public agency partnerships and cooperation that bring value and benefit to the communities we serve.

Without this agreement between WRD and West Basin this project would not be built," said Albert Robles, President of the Board of Directors of WRD.

West Basin will provide the water to WRD for use at the West Coast Basin Barrier, operated by the L.A. County Department of Public Works. The water injected into the barrier under pressure holds back the ocean and prevents it from contaminating local groundwater supplies. This water additionally replenishes drinking water aquifers.

West Basin will expand its Edward C. Little Water Recycling Facility for the fifth time to produce the additional purified water for the recycled water barrier. The facility has been expanded four times in the past to provide recycled water to more than 200 sites throughout the South Bay.

WRD has been a partner with West Basin since the first phase was built.

The Edward C. Little Water Recycling Facility takes wastewater that would otherwise be sent to the ocean and, through advanced water purification technologies, makes five types of "designer" waters. It is the only facility in the world to do so.

The barrier is currently supplied with 75% recycled water and 25% imported water. Converting the barrier to 100% recycled water will free up much needed drinking water and save energy over importing water from Northern California.

###

More in Drinking Water