Alternative Power to Operate Water Quality Systems

Sosnowiec, a city located in southern Poland, supplies water to approximately 220,000 households.

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Sosnowiec, a city located in southern Poland, supplies water to approximately 220,000 households. The source of this water is a large reservoir located north of the city. The water runs into the city from several points, which are all connected to one main pipeline.

Sosnowiec Water is the utility company responsible for guaranteeing the steady water supply for the city, as well as for maintaining the water’s quality and treating it after use. The utility has recently initiated a strategic program for monitoring the quality of water at all points of access into the city. The water monitoring systems are installed inside underground water chambers 2-3 meters below the ground. They are directly connected to the water distribution pipelines and monitor them at all times, requiring a relatively high supply of steady power (8 watts).

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The HydroSpin system provides a steady, reliable, 24/7 energy flow.

Steadily supplying power to an underground system 24 hours per day, when the chamber itself is flooded for most of year and constantly wet and damp, is a challenging task. Connecting to the power grid is costly and necessitates bureaucratic dependency on a local power company.

In July 2015, a HydroSpin system was installed in one of the Sosnowiec water chambers.

The installation was elegant, quick and simple, requiring little effort and minimal human resources to accomplish.

The HydroSpin system provides a steady, reliable, 24/7 energy flow, allowing the continuous collection of water monitoring data, with no need for battery replacements or to invest additional resources in connecting to a local power grid.


HydroSpin Monitoring Solutions is exhibiting at AWWA’sACE16 expo in Booth 955.

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