Combating terrorism technology support office technical support working group

The Technical Support Working Group and FEMA have sponsored the development of two software tools that address water supply and water source contamination and consequence management.

March 26, 2001 — The Technical Support Working Group, the Federal Interagency group focusing on developing new technology for Countering Terrorism, in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), has sponsored the development of two Infrastructure Protection software tools that address water supply and water source contamination and consequence management.

The first product, PipelineNet, is a Geographic Information System (GIS)-based software tool with integrated data base capability that can be used to model the flow and concentration of contaminants in a city's drinking water pipeline infrastructure. It contains a pipe network hydraulic model (EPANET), maps, and a US Census Population database. The PipelineNet model estimates the population at risk due to the introduction of contaminants in the public water supply and graphically maps this population.

The PipelineNet model permits the user to model the flow and concentration of a biological or chemical agent within a city or municipal water system. This model assesses the effects of water treatment on the agent, models the flow and concentration of an agent through the water distribution system within a city or municipality, and calculates the population at risk.

For non-emergency purposes, PipelineNet can be used by municipalities to plan and monitor water treatment management, model present and future demand predictions, assist fire departments with assessment of fire flow requirements, plan and design new distribution systems and expansions, and assist complying with drinking water regulations. PipelineNet is in operational use in Salt Lake City, Utah.

The second product, RiverSpill, is a Geographic Information System (GIS)-based software tool with integrated data base capability that is used to track and model the flow and concentration of contaminants in water supplies. RiverSpill has been developed and is operational in Ohio and Utah.

For emergency response and consequence management purposes, both products can be connected to the Internet via a modem or Cellular accessible network to enable multiple inputs and assessments from various locations in a large-scale disaster situation.

Both systems are operational in the Windows 95/98/2000/NT environment on either laptop or desktop computers. The minimum requirements are 64Mb Ram, 40 Mb of free disk space. A CD-ROM drive is also required. The RiverSpill system also requires Arcview( (version 3.2 or higher) with the Network Analyst (version 1.0).

The developer, SAIC, will make RiverSpill available to Federal, State, and local water systems. SAIC, working under contract with on-site engineers and the digitized Reach File database, will integrate the necessary data into the RiverSpill model and deliver immediately usable software package to the user. Subsequent to this delivery, SAIC will provide technical support to the user to ensure that the software is functioning correctly.

For additional information, refer to Technical Briefs on these technologies on the TSWG web site at www.tswg.gov.

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