NSF includes two test methods to reduce PFOA and PFOS in water

In order to comply with the NSF standards, the water treatment devices must have the ability to reduce PFOA and PFOS concentrations in drinking water to below the 70 parts per trillion (ppt) health advisory level.

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Image by Myriam Zilles from Pixabay

WASHINGTON, MAY 30, 2019 -- The NSF International, along with its joint committee of stakeholders that maintain the American National Standards for drinking water treatment and reverse osmosis (RO) devices, has added two standards to include test methods for the reduction of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS).

PFOA and PFOS acid are part of a group of common groundwater contaminants, commonly referred to as perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs).

In order to comply with the NSF standards, the water treatment devices must have the ability to reduce PFOA and PFOS concentrations in drinking water to below the 70 parts per trillion (ppt) health advisory level, as set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

The PFOA and PFOS performance requirements were earlier outlined in a protocol named NSF P473, which was developed by the NSF to evaluate drinking water treatment devices, using science-based test methods.

NSF International Director of Standards Development Jessica Evans said: "Given the number of communities impacted by PFAS contamination of their drinking water sources, this update is very timely.

"In addition to PFOA and PFOS, the joint committee overseeing NSF/ANSI 53 and NSF/ANSI 58 may soon consider requirements for the reduction of other PFAS chemicals."

The standards NSF/ANSI 53 and NSF/ANSI 58 are developed and maintained by the NSF according to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) policies, which require approval from regulatory bodies and consent from industrial groups.

NSF also operates a separate ANSI-accredited certification program, apart from accelerating the development of consensus standards.

Based in the US, NSF International is a global public health organization that provides standards development, inspection, testing and certification services.

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