Colorado water utility receives national recognition

Clifton Water District's Charles A. Strain Water Treatment Plant in Clifton, Colorado, has received the "Directors Award of Recognition" from the Partnership for Safe Water, a national volunteer initiative developed by EPA and other water organizations representing water suppliers striving to provide their communities with drinking water quality that surpasses the required federal standards. The Clifton Water District successfully completed the Self-Assessment and Peer Review phase...

• Less than one percent of nation's utilities receive honor

DENVER, CO, Dec. 5, 2007 -- Clifton Water District's Charles A. Strain Water Treatment Plant in Clifton, Colorado, has received the "Directors Award of Recognition" from the Partnership for Safe Water, a national volunteer initiative developed by EPA and other water organizations representing water suppliers striving to provide their communities with drinking water quality that surpasses the required federal standards. The Clifton Water District successfully completed the Self-Assessment and Peer Review phase of the Partnership program, a phase which consists of identifying factors that limit treatment plant performance.

"We are thrilled to receive this award," said David Payne, Water Treatment Plant Laboratory Superintendent. "Our goal is to continually strive to improve our water quality, and by joining the ranks as one of the highest performing plants in the country, we have taken a large step toward achieving this goal." The award was presented to the utility Dec. 4. Representatives from AWWA, U.S. EPA and the Colorado Dept. of Public Health & Environment made the presentation.

The Partnership currently includes more than 200 water utilities, collectively serving more than 85 million people. This represents more than 60% of the U.S. population served by surface water supplies. Each utility has committed to the enhancement of drinking water quality and operational excellence in water treatment. As members of the Partnership, utilities make a pledge to their communities to improve their treatment operations to reduce the risk of exposure to microbial contaminants, namely Cryptosporidium, a parasite that can cause illness. By making this commitment, the member utilities' treatment practices undergo a rigorous review developed by national experts, and includes a four-phased, self-assessment and peer-review process.

The Partnership for Safe Water is sponsored by the American Water Works Association, Association of Metropolitan Water Agencies, Association of State Drinking Water Administrators, United States Environmental Protection Agency, National Association of Water Companies, and the American Water Works Association Research Foundation.

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