EPA awards $50K grant to L.A. school district to educate students on water conservation

The Environmental Protection Agency recently announced that it has awarded an environmental education grant of $50,000 to the Los Angeles Unified School District to develop and implement curriculum focused on water sustainability in a changing climate.

SAN FRANCISCO, CA, Nov. 11, 2015 -- The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently announced that it has awarded an environmental education grant of $50,000 to the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) to develop and implement curriculum focused on water sustainability in a changing climate.

Five middle schools and five high schools -- a total of 20 classrooms -- will learn about water conservation, recycled water and stormwater run-off management. The project will focus on classrooms with a higher percentage of female students and English Language Learners and is expected to reach at least 520 teachers and students.

Students will learn the science behind water sustainability -- such as water chemistry, biology and the significance of water through critical thinking. On-site learning include tours to the local wastewater treatment plant, where the students will conduct water audits and develop plans of action to reduce water use at schools and at home. LAUSD has partnered with the Los Angeles Sanitation District, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and Metropolitan Water District on the project under the One Water LA educational initiative.

"California is facing one of the most severe droughts on record, so it's important for students to learn to reduce and conserve water," said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA's Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. "Through the 'One Water LA' program, the District is equipping the next generation to tackle problems such as drought and climate change."

Superintendent Ramon Cortines added, "Educators need to create the next generation of Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) experts in the workforce, and this curriculum will increase the STEM education pipeline from middle to high school. It is important to educate students to be college-prepared as STEM majors and career-ready for STEM jobs."

EPA's Environmental Education Local Grants Program supports environmental education projects that increase the public's awareness and provide them with the skills to take responsible actions to protect the environment. The Agency's Pacific Southwest Regional Office received over 80 applications this year, and the LAUSD project is one of seven projects in the Pacific Southwest Region that will receive an environmental education grant.

See also:

"The Recycling Revolution: Water Recycling Trends, Technologies in CA amid Ongoing Drought"

"California's Water Woes: A Deeper Look at the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act"

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