EPA seeks comments on proposed changes to Indiana drinking water program

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 5 seeks comments on its tentative decision to approve two changes to Indiana's drinking water program.

CHICAGO, Oct. 3, 2001 — U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 5 seeks comments on its tentative decision to approve two changes to Indiana's drinking water program.

The 1996 Safe Drinking Water Act amendments required Indiana to adopt the Consumer Confidence Rule and change the definition of a public water supply.

Under the Consumer Confidence Rule, each community drinking water system must provide its customers with a brief annual report on the quality of its drinking water, as well as information on the system's compliance with drinking water regulations.

In 1996, the definition of a public water supply was expanded to include systems that provide water for human consumption not only through pipes but also through other constructed conveyances such as flumes, canals or waterways.

As EPA adopts new drinking-water regulations, states that administer their own drinking-water programs must adopt regulations at least as stringent.

If there is sufficient public interest, EPA will hold a public hearing on the proposed changes. Comments and requests for a hearing must be postmarked by Oct. 29 and should be sent to: U.S. EPA Region 5, Ground Water and Drinking Water Branch (WG-15J), 77 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, IL 60604-3590.

Background documents on the proposed changes are available for review at the Indiana Department of Environmental Management, Drinking Water Branch, 100 N. Senate Ave., Indianapolis, IN, and at EPA offices in Chicago.

About EPA

Founded in 1970, EPA is responsible for protecting the environment and human health. The Agency enforces air, water and land laws and ensures that designated health standards are met. EPA Region 5 includes six Great Lakes states: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin.

SOURCE: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

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