Study examines copper, estrogenic compounds in sewage treatment plant water

A new study discusses how copper and other metals may reduce the toxicity and bioavailability of estrogenic and endocrine-disrupting compounds in sewage treatment plant effluents. The reduction can lead to less exposure of aquatic species and can lessen the presence of such compounds in drinking water. The study's researchers, led by Jong Yol Park, tested the endocrine-disrupting capability of well known endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) in the presence of various concentrations of copper...

One Environment's Poison is Another Environment's Cure: Copper and Estrogenic Compounds in Water from Sewage Treatment Plants

A new study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry discusses how copper and other metals may reduce the toxicity and bioavailability of estrogenic and endocrine-disrupting compounds in sewage treatment plant effluents. This reduction can lead to less exposure of aquatic species and can lessen the presence of such compounds in drinking water.

The study's researchers, led by Jong Yol Park, tested the endocrine-disrupting capability of well known endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) in the presence of various concentrations of copper. These authors are the first to report that metals can interact with EDCs containing -OH groups, forming complexes with metals and, thereby, reducing estrogenic activities. Although the authors tested only copper, other metals such as zinc were present in effluents and surface waters and may also reduce the endocrine-disrupting properties of EDCs.

To read the entire study, see: http://www.allenpress.com/pdf/i1552-8618-27-3-535.pdf

Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry is the monthly journal of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC).

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