USGS sends crews in Indiana to measure flooding

During Jan. 7th and 8th, moderate to heavy rains fell on soils already saturated from snowmelt in northern Indiana, causing significant flooding on rivers and streams. By Jan. 11, 38 Indiana streamgages had recorded water levels above flood stage. New record stages were measured on the Tippecanoe River in north-central Indiana and Kankakee River in northwest Indiana. The Tippecanoe River at Delphi Indiana streamflow-gaging station reached a record stage of 17.83 feet on Jan. 8...

• New records set at Tippecanoe and Kankakee River gages

RESTON, VA, Jan. 11, 2008 -- During Jan. 7th and 8th, moderate to heavy rains fell on soils already saturated from snowmelt in northern Indiana, causing significant flooding on rivers and streams. By Jan. 11, 38 Indiana streamgages had recorded water levels above flood stage. New record stages were measured on the Tippecanoe River in north-central Indiana and Kankakee River in northwest Indiana. The Tippecanoe River at Delphi Indiana streamflow-gaging station reached a record stage of 17.83 feet on Jan. 8; the previous record stage was 13.72 feet set in 1994. The Kankakee River near Davis Indiana station reached a record stage of 13.59 feet on Jan. 11; the previous record stage was 13.52 feet set in 1985.

Teams of USGS hydrographers have traveled to 40 streamflow-gaging stations to keep station instruments operating and to verify streamflow data needed for National Weather Service (NWS) flood forecasts. USGS personnel have worked closely with Federal, state, and local agencies during the flood to provide flood information for emergency managers, the media, and the public. The USGS is maintaining a Web page that provides flood updates, photographs, and links at http://in.water.usgs.gov/flood_new/

The USGS operates a network of more than 140 stream gages throughout Indiana and provides this real-time information to the NWS where it is used for flood forecasting and to notify emergency managers. Field personnel collect data, or the gages relay it through telephones or satellites to offices where it is processed automatically in near real time. In many cases, the data are available online within minutes.

USGS Water Science Centers are located in each state. They can provide more detailed information on stream conditions and on the USGS response to local events.

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