City enacts Green Solutions policy

City of Kansas City, Mo., City Manager Wayne A. Cauthen has signed an administrative regulation to implement the City Council's Green Solutions Policy Resolution. The administrative regulation went into effect Feb. 25 and directs City departments to incorporate green solutions into City policies, projects and programs. The original resolution passed Aug. 9, 2007, and work was done over the past six months to develop the implementation plan to ensure efficient adoption across City departments...

KANSAS CITY, MO, Feb. 27, 2008 -- City of Kansas City, Mo., City Manager Wayne A. Cauthen has signed an administrative regulation to implement the City Council's Green Solutions Policy Resolution. The administrative regulation went into effect Feb. 25 and directs City departments to incorporate green solutions into City policies, projects and programs.

The original resolution passed Aug. 9, 2007, and work was done over the past six months to develop the implementation plan to ensure efficient adoption across City departments. Green solutions include green infrastructure such as rain gardens, bio-retention facilities and stream buffers, which reduce stormwater runoff and water pollution, create recreational amenities and protect natural resources. Green solutions also include renewable energy, solid waste recycling, mass transit, bike/pedestrian infrastructure and other measures that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve environmental quality.

The administrative regulation directs more than 10 City divisions and departments to explore and implement green solutions. The policy also provides for the creation of a Green Team Committee, which will direct the City's green solutions efforts, approve modification of internal business processes necessary to implement green solutions throughout the City and provide direction on innovative ways to add green solutions to City projects.

"City projects will be approached as opportunities to incorporate green solutions in a creative way to provide multiple benefits for the residents of Kansas City," said Dennis Murphey, chief environmental officer in the Office of Environmental Quality. "Solutions include reducing sewer overflows and basement flooding, improving water quality in area streams, making our city a more bike and pedestrian-friendly community, improving air quality and reducing greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change."

The original resolution was generated from a proposal from the City's Wet Weather Community Panel to incorporate green solutions into the City's long-term plans to address sewer overflows, stormwater runoff and flooding problems, but the City Council identified a broader scope in its policy.

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