VRTX CEO reselected for environmental trade committee

SCHERTZ, TX, Nov. 3, 2009 -- VRTX Technologies' Chief Executive Officer, David Nicholas, received a reappointment to serve on the Environmental Technologies Trade Advisory Committee (ETTAC)...

Nov 4th, 2009

SCHERTZ, TX, Nov. 3, 2009 -- VRTX Technologies' Chief Executive Officer, David Nicholas, received a reappointment to serve on the Environmental Technologies Trade Advisory Committee (ETTAC) as a representative of small to medium-sized business as well as the water and wastewater treatment segments of the environmental industry sector.

ETTAC is an advisory committee for the Secretary of Commerce and the Trade Promotion Coordinating Committee (TPCC) created to advise the U.S. government on environmental trade policies and programs, and to help focus resources on increasing exports of the U.S. environmental industry.

The committee was established in 1994 after the U.S. Department of Commerce recognized that increasing exports creates a challenge for the U.S. environmental technologies industry, which is dominated by small to medium-sized businesses that may lack resources needed to pursue opportunities overseas. ETTAC works to identify the challenges facing exporters and recommends changes to the TPCC.

The environmental technologies global market is roughly $659 billion. As the world's largest producer and consumer of environmental technologies, the US generates around $282 billion in revenue every year. Export percentages continue to grow from 5.7 percent in 1997 to over 10 percent in 2009; however, the same factor for U.S. key competitors such as Japan, Germany, France and the UK exceeds 20 percent.

"As a renewed member of the committee, it is my duty to reflect concerns and interests of the private sector," said Nicholas. "It is important that we implement programs to enhance competitiveness in environmental industry."

VRTX(tm) Technologies, a Schertz, Texas-based fluid technology company, specializes in environmentally-friendly chemical free treatment of water used in cooling towers and evaporative condensers. The VRTX system relies on kinetic energy, hydrodynamic cavitation, and chemical equilibrium to control scale, corrosion, and bio-fouling without the hazards of chemical treatment. VRTX also minimizes corrosion and microbiological growth, reduces system operating costs, and conserves water and energy. Studies show that a typical VRTX-treated cooling tower system could see annual potable water savings of nearly 1 million gallons.

For more information on VRTX Technologies, please visit www.vrtxtech.com

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