NSF waterborne pathogens course set for Sept. 14

A new course from NSF International and HC Information Resources, "Waterborne Pathogens: Minimizing Risk Associated with Building Water Systems," offers strategies to mitigate risk and address legal issues associated with waterborne pathogens including Cryptosporidium, hepatitis A, Legionella and Norwalk virus.

Aug 2nd, 2004

ANN ARBOR, MI, July 30, 2004 -- A new course from NSF International and HC Information Resources, "Waterborne Pathogens: Minimizing Risk Associated with Building Water Systems," offers strategies to mitigate risk and address legal issues associated with waterborne pathogens including Cryptosporidium, hepatitis A, Legionella and Norwalk virus.

Waterborne pathogens are disease-causing bacteria, viruses and protozoans that are transmitted to people when they consume untreated or inadequately treated water. This consumption may cause severe digestive system problems, which can be life threatening to the very young, very old or those with weakened immune systems.

Course overview
The course, to be held Sept. 14 at NSF Headquarters in Ann Arbor, Michigan will examine preventative strategies and provide recommendations for implementing measures to protect against waterborne pathogens:

Kelly Reynolds, Ph.D.
Environmental science researcher and public health educator at the University of Arizona specializing in microbial water quality, food safety, and pathogen transmission will give an overview of several waterborne pathogens, discussing microbiology, associated illnesses, exposure routes, prevention, water treatment and control.

Matt Freije
Author of Legionellae Control in Health Care Facilities: A Guide for Minimizing Risk will cover government regulations and industry guidelines for Legionella, outlining risk reduction strategies for hospitals, hotels, office buildings and industrial facilities.

Why is this an important public health issue?
According to microbeworld.org, an estimated 2,038 Americans became ill from 17 outbreaks associated with drinking water during 1997-1998, according to the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's recent survey of water-related outbreaks. Infectious bacteria or protozoa were responsible for 10 of the outbreaks. Two were determined to have a chemical cause; the cause for the other five could not be determined with certainty. During the same period, more than 2,000 people became ill from 32 outbreaks associated with recreational waters - beaches, lakes, and rivers, and most were caused by infectious bacteria, viruses or protozoa.

Who should attend?
Industrial hygienists, facility managers, safety directors, water utility personnel, environmental health officers, manufacturers, infection control directors, public health officials, property managers, water treatment specialists and risk managers are encouraged to participate.

What's included ?
-- Course manual
-- The book, Legionellae Control in Health Care Facilities: A Guide for Minimizing Risk (a $79 value)
-- Certificate of attendance
-- 0.6 CEUs

NSF International, an independent, not-for-profit organization, certifies products and writes standards to help protect food, water, air and consumers goods. Founded in 1944, it's committed to protecting public health and safety worldwide. NSF is a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Food and Water Safety and Indoor Environment. Additional services include safety audits for the food and water industries, management systems registrations delivered through NSF International Strategic Registrations Ltd. and education through the NSF Center for Public Health Education. For more information or to register online for this event, go to www.nsf.org/cphe or call NSF at 1-800-673-6275, ext. 5703.

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