Global Ecology Corp. initiates first domestic water, soil remediation proposals

Homeland Security Network, doing business as Global Ecology Corporation (GEC), has taken sludge samples from its first four potential water and soil remediation projects in the U.S. and will submit proposals to the appropriate regulatory authorities as soon as the samples are quantified. The company believes the proposals will meet the needs and requirements and should result in projects starting in the next 45 days...

KEASBEY, NJ, Aug. 5, 2008 -- Homeland Security Network, doing business as Global Ecology Corporation (GEC), has taken sludge samples from its first four potential water and soil remediation projects in the U.S. and will submit proposals to the appropriate regulatory authorities as soon as the samples are quantified. The company believes the proposals will meet the needs and requirements and should result in projects starting in the next 45 days.

The projects, two in Florida and two in New Jersey, will deploy the use of both the remediation process for extracted sludge and for "in place" remediation of the lake bottom sludge, which can reduce polluted sediment volume by up to 75%. This technique is especially desirable where dredging is either physically impossible or not economically feasible.

Peter Ubaldi, GEC's president said, "These projects are perfect examples of our company's market-place advantage over competing technologies. We can treat contaminated locations where others cannot and our remediated byproduct produces one of the finest naturally fertilized organic soil in the world."

Additionally, the company confirmed that a large California farming consortium has ordered initial samples of its "Gourmet Soil" now being produced by the company's joint venture project with Huma-Clean in Juarez, Mexico. GEC projects the total yield for Juarez will exceed 8.5 million tons of organic soil over the next three to four years.

William Merritt, director of business development said, "Recent studies estimate that several hundred thousand farming acres in California's Central Valley have been vacated due to poor soil conditions. We have submitted our soil samples for certified analysis and strongly believe that our product can economically and efficiently solve the soil problems currently being experienced in the region."

Global Ecology Corporation (GEC) has obtained exclusive rights to several EPA-approved technologies in the water treatment and soil remediation fields that helps reduce algae, bottom sludge and harmful bacteria and is able to provide "green" and, if needed, transportable methods to recover the usability of water, soil and land.

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