CDM earns patent for perchlorate bioremediation technology

CDM, a global consulting, engineering, construction, and operations firm, announced it has been issued a patent for a new in situ bioremediation technology known as gaseous electron donor injection technology (GEDIT). The innovative process involves the injection of specialized gases into soil or groundwater to stimulate biological degradation of perchlorate, nitrates, chlorinated compounds, halogenated organics, energetics, and other pollutants. CDM developed the technology in response...

• Process stimulates anaerobic, biological reduction of perchlorate and other contaminants through injection of electron donors as a gas for better distribution in contaminated zones

CAMBRIDGE, MA, Nov. 1, 2007 -- CDM, a global consulting, engineering, construction, and operations firm, announced it has been issued a patent for a new in situ bioremediation technology known as gaseous electron donor injection technology (GEDIT). The innovative process involves the injection of specialized gases into soil or groundwater to stimulate biological degradation of perchlorate, nitrates, chlorinated compounds, halogenated organics, energetics, and other pollutants.

CDM developed the technology in response to client needs for a method to treat contamination in soil that does not require excavation and can prevent further groundwater contamination. Patrick J. Evans, Ph.D., who invented the GEDIT process, says, "In situ methods involving water injection into unsaturated soil are unlikely to succeed because the liquids are not easily distributed through the soil. To date, GEDIT is the only technology that has the potential to effectively treat perchlorate and other compounds in deep soil."

GEDIT is being pilot tested with funding provided by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) Environmental Technology Certification Program (ESTCP). The average remediation cost savings per DoD site using GEDIT are estimated at $6.6 million over excavation and disposal, and $2.6 million over excavation and ex situ bioremediation. "Based on a conservative estimate of 20 applicable sites, the estimated total savings range from $50 million to $130 million for perchlorate remediation alone. The applicability of GEDIT to sites affected by other contaminants could expand these savings significantly," says Evans.

Andrea Leeson, Ph.D., ESTCP Program Manager for Environmental Restoration, adds, "This project is demonstrating and validating a necessary and cost-effective in situ bioremediation technology for perchlorate and potentially other compounds."

The technology has been issued U.S. patent number 7,282,149. GEDIT is available for licensing through CDM. For more information, see: http://www.cdm.com/knowledge_center/case_studies/gedit_for_perchlorate_bioremediation.htm

CDM is a consulting, engineering, construction, and operations firm delivering exceptional service to public and private clients worldwide.

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