eWaterTek develops new water testing technology with partner support

Uncertainty about water quality is running high these days - from Walkerton to terrorism scenarios - there's a fear of what can potentially happen between our purifying plants and taps. But now, with the help of key industry supporters, a new technology from eWaterTek Inc. is set to change all that...

TORONTO, Canada, Aug. 31, 2004 (Canada NewsWire) -- Uncertainty about water quality is running high these days - from Walkerton to terrorism scenarios - there's a fear of what can potentially happen between our purifying plants and taps. But now, with the help of key industry supporters, a new technology from eWaterTek Inc. is set to change all that.

Currently in Canada, only at the water treatment plant is there guarantee of the condition of your water. After that, spot checks are occasionally conducted at intervals along the path to where it's consumed, but they are costly and not 100 % effective. Through lasers that identify irregular-shaped particles in the drinking water, the design by eWaterTek eliminates the unknown by sounding an alarm before it reaches our taps and after its journey through the kilometers of municipal pipes.

With this innovative domestic water warning system, the company is now ready to revolutionize the water industry. President & CIO, Harold Moskoff who developed the technology, credits the success in large part to connections made through the Ontario Environment Industry Association's (ONEIA) networking events.

"ONEIA helped solidify contacts and gain credibility with a variety of organizations by providing the first portal for industry to see eWaterTek Inc. as an environmental company, as opposed to one focused solely on water," says Moskoff. "We were subsequently able to attend some very high-profile environmental conferences and raise the awareness of our company and product within a very short time span."

This broader approach that opened the door to many new possibilities ensued from attending an ONEIA Environmental Business Opportunity Breakfast (EBOB). It was there that the eWaterTek technology was introduced and began to gain the approval of key people in Industry Canada and in the water technology and investment sectors.

This led to a federal grant that helped sponsor eWaterTek Inc.'s attendance at POLLUTEC 2003 in France where Moskoff featured their product and procured their first private investors from the French financial community.

"Thanks to Odette Corbu, our Trade Commissioner at Industry Canada, whom we met at an ONEIA breakfast, we received the federal grant to help sponsor our attendance - our first 'trade mission' on the Team Canada roster," says Moskoff. "She believed in us, and took a risk to promote a small technology firm. In fact, our little booth in the corner had the most traffic. The Canadian Ambassador to France was also very helpful, Jean Saint-Jacques, who has offered to help us in any cross-border regulatory issues."

More recently, eWaterTek went to the Globe 2004 conference in Vancouver. Interest in their technology was high as Canadian municipalities all over the country, and especially in Ontario, are having trouble complying with new water regulations that require purchasing large, costly water monitors.

Now eWaterTek is set to install its first system into a Vaughan Housing CO-OP. In the future, they're looking to partner with the premier laser company in Silicon Valley, California to complete their first UV prototype.

And at the 2008 Beijing Olympics there's already talk of a need for new water quality technology for their model sustainable communities.

With growing support at home and abroad, eWaterTek is positioned to ensure the water we're drinking is safe before it reaches our glasses, providing a technology that can finally put worries to rest about the quality of our most essential resource.

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