Stormwater treatment technology approved in Maryland to combat Chesapeake Bay nutrient load

Imbrium's Jellyfish® Filter has been approved by the Montgomery County Maryland Department of Permitting Services to treat polluted stormwater runoff heading for the Chesapeake Bay...

ROCKVILLE, MD, July 18, 2011 -- Imbrium'sJellyfish® Filter has been approved by the Montgomery County Maryland Department of Permitting Services to treat polluted stormwater runoff heading for the Chesapeake Bay.

The Chesapeake Bay will need to shed 63 million pounds of nitrogen and 3.1 million pounds of phosphorus in order to reach a healthy stage, with a significant portion of that coming from the urban core, which will be significantly redeveloped over the next several decades. According to recent federal EPA estimates, the Chesapeake Bay can accommodate 187.4 million pounds of nitrogen and 12.5 million pounds of phosphorus washing off its watershed annually.

"Montgomery County Maryland has been a leader for over two decades in addressing stormwater pollution from a practical level using a variety of tools that account for water quality performance as well as maintenance. The Jellyfish Filter offers an important tool to protect the Chesapeake Bay Watershed from the ravages of sediment and nutrients - especially phosphorus and nitrogen. Imbrium Systems is quite excited about this approval," stated Scott Perry, Imbrium Systems' Managing Director.

Since the introduction of the Jellyfish Filter into the North American marketplace, the membrane filtration system has experienced a tremendous acceptance among environmentalists, civil engineers, environmental engineers and commercial developers who are committed to protecting North America's watersheds.

"Our rigorous TARP (Technical Acceptance Reciprocity Partnership) field testing has demonstrated that the Jellyfish Filter removes 85% TSS (Total Suspended Solids), 60% Total Phosphorus (TP) and 50% Total Nitrogen (TN). We listened to the design and regulatory community and designed the Jellyfish Filter as a compact, high treatment rate membrane filter system that captures a significant pollutant load, with low cost maintenance requirements," stated Joel Garbon, Product Manager for Imbrium Systems.

Jellyfish Filter systems have been successfully installed across North America, including California, Oregon, Washington State, Colorado, Montana, New Jersey, Virginia, New York, and Canada.

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