Guidebook offers advice on performing energy audits

Industrial conservation is one of the most cost-effective energy resources available. The Bonneville Power Authority (BPA) is offering a free guidebook for performing walk-through energy audits can help make an industrial facility more competitive.

Feb 13th, 2004

Feb. 13, 2004 -- Industrial conservation is one of the most cost-effective energy resources available. The Bonneville Power Authority (BPA) is offering a free guidebook for performing walk-through energy audits can help make an industrial facility more competitive.

Downloadable PDF version of Industrial Audit Guidebook(50 pages)

The purpose of the Industrial Audit Guidebook is to introduce the user, both technical and non-technical, to common opportunities that may be found in an industrial facility to reduce electrical energy consumption.

It has not been developed as a sole reference to support the user in completing an analysis; but it has been developed to be an aid in the first and perhaps most critical step in performing an audit: touring the facility and quickly identifying energy savings opportunities.

For the technical user, this guide can help determine where to focus efforts for a detailed energy audit. For the non-technical user, this guide will assist in developing a list of potential energy saving opportunities to refer to qualified personnel for additional study.

This guide may also be used as a checklist when conducting a phone survey with a facility to determine whether or not a detailed energy audit is necessary.

Download the complete guidebook in PDF format by clicking on the link below:
Downloadable PDF version of Industrial Audit Guidebook(50 pages)

The basic audit process

Before a walk-through of the industrial facility, a meeting should be held with the appropriate plant personnel that are familiar with the physical condition and day-to-day operation of the manufacturing equipment in the facility. The purpose of the meeting is to determine where the company should focus its attention during the walk-through audit:

• Lighting Systems
• Material Handling Systems
• Motors, Belts and Drives
• Hydraulic Systems
• Fans and Pumps
• Injection Molding or Extrusion
• Compressed Air Systems
• Veneer Dryers
• Steam Systems
• Kiln Drying
• Refrigeration Systems
• Energy Management

Note: The energy savings opportunities are not limited to the systems, technologies, and equipment listed above. These are just the more common ones.

The next step is to go through the checklist of questions in the guidebook that pertain to the facility. All of these questions may not be answered in the meeting and, therefore, should be "flagged" to be addressed during the walk-through.

As you go through the checklist of questions, this is a good opportunity to discuss any concerns that the plant personnel may have with implementing the energy saving measures corresponding with each checklist item. This process will help you to determine the energy savings measures that have already been implemented and those that may or may not be applicable to this facility.

At this point you should have a better sense of which areas in the facility to focus your attention on during the walk-through and who should accompany you. The following tools may be useful in performing the walk-through audit:

• Clipboard
• Flashlight
• Camera
• Light Meter
• Phillips and Standard Screwdrivers

True RMS meter, if not available, a Clamp on Amp Meter.

The next step is to tour the facility with the appropriate plant personnel that are familiar with the various areas that you will be auditing. As you tour the facility, refer to the guide to ensure that you answer any remaining checklist questions. The back of each page can be used to record your observations, such as equipment nameplate data, gage readings, meter readings, and to make notes, such as areas that require further study, equipment operators names, phone numbers, etc.

After the tour is completed, a wrap up meeting should be held to review your findings. At this point, a list of potential energy saving opportunities that should be considered for additional study can be developed.

The guidebook itself contains much more information about the energy audit process.

For more information, contact:

Christopher B. Milan, PE, CEM
Mechanical & Civil Engineer
Bonneville Power Administration
Energy Efficiency Department
905 N.E. 11th Avenue
Portland, Oregon 97232
503-230-3611


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