Stormwater filtration system achieves CULD approval from Washington Department of Ecology

Sponsored by
Aquip® Enhanced Stormwater Filtration System from StormwateRx.

PORTLAND, OR, July 28, 2011 -- The Aquip® Enhanced Stormwater Filtration System from StormwateRx has been approved by the Washington Department of Ecology with a Conditional Use Level Designation (CULD) for Basic, Enhanced and Phosphorus treatment. With this designation, Aquip is approved for use on new and redevelopment projects in Washington.

"We are extremely pleased to have achieved CULD approval from the State of Washington," said Calvin Noling, president and CEO of StormwateRx, LLC. "This provides a powerful, independent verification of our Aquip system and the high standards of quality and effectiveness of the StormwateRx BMPs in keeping industrial sites in compliance with environmental benchmarks."

The State of Washington Department of Ecology evaluates stormwater treatment technologies using its Technology Assessment Protocol -- Ecology (TAPE). The CULD approval was granted based upon review by a board of external reviewers consisting of stormwater experts from across the United States. Under this protocol for Washington, Aquip is the first and only industrial stormwater treatment system to achieve CULD approval for the treatment of solids, metals and nutrients in stormwater.

According to the Department of Ecology, several other states, counties and cities also use TAPE certification to determine whether a technology can be installed within their jurisdiction, including Sacramento, CA; Denver, CO, St. Louis, MO, the State of New Hampshire, Portland, OR, the Oregon Department of Transportation and the State of Rhode Island.

###

Sponsored by

TODAY'S HEADLINES

City of Lima, Ohio, enters CWA settlement to reduce critical sewage overflows

To resolve claims that untreated sewer discharges were released into the Ottawa River during wet weather, the city of Lima, Ohio, has entered into a Clean Water Act settlement with the Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Justice and State of Ohio.

AWWA to Congress: Nutrient pollution reduction key to preventing cyanotoxins

In a testimony recently held before the U.S. House Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy, American Water Works Association President John Donahue stressed that the solution to keeping drinking water safe from cyanotoxins begins with reducing nutrient pollution.

Reclamation invests $9.2M in water, power research in West amid drought

Following a year of record drought, water managers throughout the West are searching for information and ideas to ensure a reliable and sustainable water supply. To meet this growing need, the Bureau of Reclamation has officially awarded $9.2 million for 131 research projects.

City of Philadelphia names first 'Stormwater Pioneer'

The Philadelphia Water Department has named Stanley's True Value Hardware as the city's first Stormwater Pioneer. The store's third-generation owners were recognized as role models for small business owners and private developers looking to reduce stormwater runoff.

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA