Sequencing Batch Reactor set for Ho Chi Minh City’s new 820 m3/day WWTP

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To protect the Saigon River from wastewater contamination, the People's Committee of Ho Chi Minh City will construct a central wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) at the Thanh My Loi Ward in District 2, with a final capacity of 820,000 m³/day.

The wastewater inflow pumping station will be fed through a gravity sewer, with a diameter of 3 m, entering the WWTP 30 meters below ground level.

The discharge point will be 2.5 meters above ground level, to allow free outflow during high tide and under future climate conditions with rising seawater levels. The World Bank will provide financing for the WWTP project with an investment of approx. US$265 million.

Basing on a feasibility study, the City has decided for a DBO tender (Design, Build, Operate), with a private contractor to build the plant and operate it for a period of five years with the option of another five years contract extension.

The effluent quality shall meet Vietnamese Standard A (30 mg BOD/L; 5 mg NH4-N/L). The process foreseen is an SBR technology (Sequencing Batch Reactor), with post disinfection by UV radiation.

The sewage sludge shall be stabilised through anaerobic digestion, and dewatered with strong chamber filter presses, ready for landfill deposit. The biogas produced in the digesters will be utilised in a combined power plant.

An advanced SCADA system shall be installed for computerised remote control, to secure successful WWTP operations. The computerised WWTP process control will have to deal with huge variations of organic loading, from high BOD (biochemical oxygen demand) content during dry weather and low tide to a very low BOD content during the monsoon rainfall and high tide.

The Consultants for Environmental Engineering and Management (CEEM - Prof Dr Dr Rudolph GmbH) from Germany have been assigned for the design and tendering of the wastewater treatment plant.

IMA has classified the project as "very urgent" and is expecting the DBO contract to be awarded until mid 2015.

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