Austalian water pioneer to compete for Stockholm junior prize

A 17-year old student from Australia's Gold Coast will be representing Australia in this year's Stockholm Junior Water Prize with a project to help improve future water management and the health of local ecosystems...

Jul 18th, 2011

QUEENSLAND, Australia, July 18, 2011 -- A student from Australia's Gold Coast will be representing Australia in this year's Stockholm Junior Water Prize with a project to help improve future water management and the health of local ecosystems.

Mathuja Bavan, 17, has led a study to investigate whether phosphate runoff from golf courses contributed to eutrophication in adjacent water bodies. She is currently studying a Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery at the University of Queensland.

Bavan said: “I think that this is one of the appealing features of water-related and environmentally related studies- a large amount of the study requires field work, increasing your sense of involvement and understanding of the issues being investigated."

The award selects the world's brightest junior water scientists who have developed practical and innovative projects aimed at solving water related problems.

This year's World Water Week will be taking place between August 21-27 and will also see Stephen Carpenter, professor of Zoology and Limnology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, collecting the prestigious Stockholm Water Prize (see Water & Wastewater International story).

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